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The rules for deducting personal casualty losses on a tax return have changed for 2018 to 2025. Specifically, you generally can’t deduct losses unless the casualty event qualifies as a federally declared disaster.

The rules for writing off personal casualty losses on a tax return have changed for 2018 to 2025. Specifically, taxpayers generally can’t deduct losses unless the casualty event qualifies as a federally declared disaster. (The rules for business or income-producing property are different.) Another factor that now makes it harder to claim a casualty loss is that you must itemize deductions to claim one. For 2018 to 2025, fewer people will itemize, because the standard deduction amounts have been significantly increased. We can help you navigate the complex rules.


In a tax identity theft scheme, a thief uses your personal information to file a fraudulent tax return electronically early in the tax filing season and claim a bogus refund. Here’s how to protect yourself. 

The IRS opened the 2018 income tax return filing season on Jan. 28. Consider filing as soon as you can, even if you typically don’t file this early. It can help protect you from tax identity theft, in which a thief files a return using your Social Security number to claim a bogus refund. If you file first, it will be returns filed by any would-be thieves that are rejected by the IRS, not yours. Other benefits: You’ll get your refund sooner or, if you owe tax, you’ll know how much you owe sooner so you can be ready to pay it by April 15. Contact us with questions.


There are three major changes that will impact many individual taxpayers, beginning when they file their 2018 income tax returns. And we’re not talking about tax rate cuts or reduced itemized deductions. 

When you file your 2018 income tax return, you’ll likely find that some big tax law changes affect you, besides the much-discussed tax rate cuts and reduced itemize deductions. For 2018 through 2025, the TCJA: 1) eliminates personal exemptions, 2) increases the standard deduction and 3) expands the child credit. The degree to which these changes will affect you depends on whether you have dependents and, if so, how many. It also depends on whether you typically itemize deductions. We can help ensure you claim all of the breaks available to you on your 2018 return.


Don’t take the substantiation requirements for charitable donation deductions lightly. If you made a gift last year and haven’t received a written acknowledgment from the charity, read this before claiming a deduction on your 2018 income tax return. 

To claim an itemized deduction for a donation of more than $250, generally you need a contemporaneous written acknowledgment from the charity. “Contemporaneous” means the earlier of 1) the date you file your income tax return, or 2) the extended due date of your return. If you made a donation in 2018 but haven’t received substantiation and you’d like to deduct it, consider requesting a written acknowledgment from the charity and waiting to file your 2018 return until you receive it. Additional rules apply to certain types of donations. Contact us to learn more. 


Not as many people will benefit from the charitable deduction on their 2018 income tax returns. Find out why donations may no longer save you tax and what you can do to help ensure deductibility.


Assuming a charity is qualified, you may be able to deduct some of the out-of-pocket costs you incur when volunteering for the organization. But the rules are complex.


Have you noticed in your mailbox any notifications from online vendors from whom you purchased items during 2017 reporting your total purchases from them during the year and wondered why? This is because they did not charge you sales tax on your online purchases. And now the State of Louisiana is requiring these vendors to report to them and to you the purchase amounts so the State can ultimately collect the sales tax (actually termed “use tax” at this point in the transaction).


On December 20, Congress completed passage of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. The new law means substantial changes for individual taxpayers. For example, it reduces tax rates for most brackets, nearly doubles the standard deduction and expands the child tax credit. And it provides alternative minimum tax (AMT) and estate tax relief. But it also reduces or eliminates many tax breaks. Most changes affecting individuals are only temporary, generally applying for 2018 through 2025.


We have compiled a checklist of additional actions based on current tax rules that may help you save tax dollars if you act before year-end. Not all actions will apply in your particular situation, but you (or a family member) will likely benefit from many of them. We can narrow down the specific actions that you can take once we meet with you to tailor a particular plan. In the meantime, please review the following list and contact us at your earliest convenience so that we can advise you on which tax-saving moves to make:


Projecting your business income and expenses for this year and next can allow you to time when you recognize income and incur deductible expenses to your tax advantage. Typically, it’s better to defer tax. This might end up being especially true this year, if tax reform legislation is signed into law.


Did you know that if you’re self-employed you may be able to set up a retirement plan that allows you to contribute much more than you can contribute to an IRA or even an employer-sponsored 401(k)? There’s still time to set up such a plan for 2017, and it generally isn’t hard to do. So whether you’re a “full-time” independent contractor or you’re employed but earn some self-employment income on the side, consider setting up one of the following types of retirement plans this year.  


With kids back in school, it’s a good time for parents (and grandparents) to think about college funding. One option is a Section 529 plan. It offers the opportunity to build up a large college nest egg via tax-deferred compounding and can be particularly powerful if contributions begin when the child is quite young. Contributions aren’t deductible for federal purposes, but distributions used to pay qualified expenses are typically income-tax-free for both federal and state purposes, thus making the tax deferral a permanent savings.


An estate tax repeal is one reform that’s been proposed by Congress, but a repeal may not affect you. Here’s why.


Elementary and secondary school teachers and other eligible educators can deduct up to $250 for qualifying classroom supplies they pay for out of pocket. This is an “above-the-line” deduction, which means you don’t have to itemize. Before this special break became available, such expenditures could be deducted only as unreimbursed business expenses under the miscellaneous itemized deduction, subject to a 2% of adjusted gross income (AGI) floor, which could be a difficult threshold to meet.


If you own a home, be sure to claim all the home-related tax breaks you’re entitled to. But be aware that a couple expired at the end of 2016, and others might disappear in the future as part of tax reform.


If you don’t have “minimum essential” health coverage, beware of potential tax penalties.


The American Opportunity credit can provide valuable tax savings for families with a college student. But sometimes it makes sense for the student, rather than the parent, to claim the credit.


Do you know what individual income tax records are safe to toss? If not and you’d like to clear out your files (whether paper or electronic) of unnecessary documents, here are some guidelines.


Senate tax writers on Capitol Hill continue to discuss bipartisan retirement savings bills as the House gears up for a vote on a related tax measure.


President Donald Trump and Democratic congressional leaders have agreed to develop a $2 trillion infrastructure plan, according to Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y.


Highly anticipated proposed regulations have been issued on the withholding required with respect to the disposition of certain partnership interests. The proposed regulations affect certain foreign persons that recognize gain or loss on the disposition of an interest in a partnership that is engaged in a trade or business in the United States, and persons that acquire those interests. Also affected are partnerships that directly or indirectly have foreign partners.


Proposed regulations provide rules on the attribution of ownership of stock or other interests for determining whether a person is a related person with respect to a controlled foreign corporation (CFC) under the foreign base company sales income rules.


Final regulations have been issued on transactions of U.S. taxpayers that have qualified business units (QBUs) with functional currency other than the U.S. dollar.


Medicaid waiver payments were earned income, even though IRS Notice 2014-7 treated them as “difficulty of care” foster care payments that were excluded from gross income. The Tax Court held that excluding the payments from earned income would improperly deny the taxpayers’ earned income credit and the additional child tax credit.